Archive for the ‘Local’ Category

Album Review: Beth Bombara and the Robotic Foundation

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

St. Louisian Beth Bombara has a new band and a new sound on her recent self titled EP Beth Bombara and the Robotic Foundation. With the addition of bass and drums, her sound has matured considerably from her last EP. Expect tight bass lines, smooth drumming, and soaring vocals on every song. On “Not the World” the group proves they can do rocking pop songs as well as they can do mellow organ-driven numbers like “Beautiful You.” The instrumentation plays beautifully, but it is still the arching vocal that captures your attention on each song. I understand Beth and Co are working on a new full length, so keep an eye out for that in the coming year.

Your next chance to see Beth Bombara and the Robotic Foundation live is on September 17 at the Map Room in St. Louis.

Stack Sessions: The Blind Nils

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010

St. Louis band the Blind Nils joined us in the lounge at the station the other day for a short live performance on the air. They played 5 of their original tunes with eclectic instrumentation including banjo, slide guitar, and xylophone. Take a look the videos below for a peek into their set. Their entire set will be rebroadcast this Thursday at 3:30pm, so don’t forget to tune in at www.kwur.com.

If you like what you hear, your next chance to see the Blind Nils llive is on August 23 at Hajari House.

Album Review: Kentucky Knife Fight’s "We’re All Nameless Here"

Saturday, July 31st, 2010


Kentucky Knife Fight has been running their garage blues rock all over St. Louis for several years now, and I think it’s almost time for the revolution. With the release of their second LP We’re All Nameless Here, KKF shows themselves to be the rock n’ roll force that it deserves to be. Neither on their new album nor in their live show do KKF mess around. They get straight to the music with amped-up rockers and slow burning blues.

The whole band revolves around Jason Holler’s gravelly voice that frequently stretches to its tremulous limits. Holler keys in to the rest of the Knife Fight, providing an incredibly dynamic sound. Besides ripping guitar solos, the music has nice accents from occasional banjo and blues harp, which thankfully takes cues more from Mick Jagger than John Popper.

Besides the blues garage rock that sometimes teeters on the edge of punk, this new album also features some grooving, slower numbers. KKF even touches on gypsy romps on “Always a Bride, Never a Bribe” with the help of the Monads’ Matt Shivelbine on fiddle.

Album Review: Fattback’s "EEE PEE"

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010


Fattback is a band with a great sense of humor. Lyrical content ranges from taco stands to dinosaurs, and they are equally diverse in their musical ability. On their new EP cleverly titled “EEE PEE,” they are adept at rip roaring country-rock, blues, and finger blistering straight rock numbers. Guitarist Dave Hagerty and drummer John Joern share the lead vocal duties, but it is Dave’s songs based around goofy lyrics that steal the show. Case in point: Fattback has an “educational” song implying that dinosaurs went extinct due to a blazing hot guitar solo. We also see Fattback’s softer, mellower side on “John Greene,” which pairs banjo and electric guitar solos. All of this adds up to a band of goofy guys who like to play quirky rock music really loudly. That’s just the kind of thing I expect from a bunch of boys from St. Louis.

Oh, I forgot to mention that when you buy the EP it comes with a few extras that you’ll never be able to download off the internet. The cd comes with an old school cassette tape copy and a temporary dino tattoo! All packaged inside of a pizza box! Pure awesome? Yes.

Your next chance to see Fattback is at Off Broadway with Deer Tick on August 5.

Album Review: Pokey LaFarge’s "Riverboat Soul"

Thursday, July 15th, 2010


Pokey LaFarge has come a long way since I first saw him 5 years ago playing on street corners and in dirty bars for tips. Now he is playing international tours across the US and Europe. His newest album Riverboat Soul still features his surprisingly authentic old-time blues and dixieland, but now he has a fantastic backing band, the South City Three, to fill out his sound with upright bass, harmonica, and slide guitar. This album is his first on Free Dirt Records and features some nice guest spots from Ketch Secor of Old Crow Medicine Show on fiddle and Tommy Oliviero of Bawn in the Mash on mandolin. I am pleased to see a St. Louis boy making such great music and having some success at the same time.

Your next chance to see Pokey in St. Louis is on September 25 in Tower Grove Park or October 8 at Off Broadway.